Virtual tasting via Zoom….what’s in your glass?

With SIP and not being able to wander the wine aisles, what are you buying and what are you drinking?

Personally, I love strolling the aisles in the ‘candy store’ (AKA wine shop) and touching the merchandise. It’s frustrating not being able to do so as I do a lot of reading and I always feel as if I hit the jackpot when I stumble upon a wine I have been reading about.  It’s the thrill of a treasure hunt with an unexpected silver lining. 

By using Zoom as a way of sharing a glass of wine (or a cocktail), we have been labeling our chats as a ‘virtual wine tasting.’  That puts the pressure on me to try and choose a wine to ‘share’ that will be agreeable to a broad range of palates while not losing sight of the fact that there will not be a meal to accompany the offering.  And, oh by the way, we are really using this time to ‘catch up’ with each other and actually see a human.

I could list many producers that are crafting very nice wines, and can do so over time, but today I want to introduce you to Chateau de Saint Cosme.  This is a winery in the Southern Rhone area of France that makes many different wines from various AOPs.

Imagine…an ancient estate purchased in 1570 with grape vines already on the property.  A chateau is soon constructed over the existing cellars which contained perfectly preserved Gallo-Roman fermentation vats.  The Barruol family and their ancestors have been vignerons at the property for 14 generations.

The actual property is in Gigondas with the beautiful Dentelles de Montmirail as a backdrop.  While the vines from the property surrounding the Chateau are used for their Gigondas wine, the Chateau also produces wines from Côte-Rôtie, Condrieu, St. Joseph and Châteauneuf-Du- Pape, to name just a few of their offerings.

As with many producers, the Barruol family wear many producer hats.  First, as an Estate where they grow the grapes and produce the wine.  However, they also source grapes from other growers and produce wine under the Saint Cosme (vs. the Chateau de Saint Cosme) label. 

The Saint Cosme Cotes du Rhone 2018 is an affordable and accessible offering that hits all the ‘good quality’ targets.  While it is labeled as a Cotes du Rhone wine (which generally would mean it is a GSM blend = Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre), this wine is 100% Syrah.  That is very appealing to me as generally, to get a 100% Syrah wine, you need to move up into the Northern Rhone at a much higher price point.  The grapes for this bottling were sourced from the right bank of the Rhone in the Gard area as well as the left bank in Vinsobres from a higher elevation.

The core of the wine is purple with aromas of violets, black cherry, black pepper and black olives.  It is medium plus in body with well-integrated, silky tannins and a very long finish.  I found it pleasant for quaffing but know how wonderful this wine is with lamb chops with rosemary and garlic mashed potatoes.

For you ‘score hounds’, the critic community agrees.  Robert Parker 90 points, Wine Enthusiast 91 points and James Suckling 91 points.

I purchased for $15 and have seen it priced in the $14 – 20 range.

While I have spotlighted just one offering from this Chateau and at the accessible rung of the marketing ladder, they are producing quality wines in all areas.  The point I am hoping to make = find a quality producer and try various wines across that brand.  Some will be accessible as this Cotes du Rhone, some with be in a stretch category that you might purchase only for special occasions and others you may never buy because of the price point.  However, in a good vintage year, you can often find wines from these producers that over-deliver quality at a reasonable price.  It is also fun to have a story to tell about the wine and winery.

I hope you enjoyed this virtual tasting…stay safe out there!

Santé

Sudsy

While ‘sheltering in’, how about cleaning out your wine cellar?

I make the analogy of going to the wine shop like a kid going to a candy store.  I want one of everything and have a habit of buying several bottles of each so I can taste and evaluate them over time.  Now, while the cellar is organized and I use an Excel spreadsheet to categorize my treasures, there are usually some bottles that are overlooked and may still be awesome or may be past their prime.

Earlier this year, in the spirit of cleaning things out, our wine tasting group hosted a ‘Decade Party’ where we tasted all wines from the 2010 vintage.  The selections were from all around the world and ultimately from our cellar(s) so we knew they had been stored properly.  Making a list of the 2010 wines on hand, I then made pairs of similar wines (by varietal, region or by food pairing options).  With a dozen attendees, we split up the list of wines and dishes were prepared to showcase the wine(s).

As with any ‘over the hill’ wine tasting, you end up learning a lot.  Just for fun, here is the list of the wines we enjoyed:

Chateau Saint Cosme Gigondas  $55  WS 95 (corked)

Perrin Les Cornuds Vinsobres  $20  WS 91

Solaria Patrizia Cencioni Brunello di Montalcino  $45  JS 95

Linio Sassetti ‘Pertimali” Brunello di Montalcino $170 JS 100 (exceptional)

Monte Del Fra Valpolicella Classico Ripasso  $24  WS 89 (corked)

McLaren Vale Grenache Australia – Chapel Hill  $28  WS 89

Prado Enea Grand Reserva Muga Rioja  $60  JS 99 (exceptional)

Dogliani Barolo – Axidena Agricola La Fusina  $49  WE 93 (exceptional)

Robert Giraud Chateau Timberlay Bordeaux Superior  $48  WS 87

Saint-Estephe Lafon-Rochet  $69  WS 89

Pine Ridge ‘Tessitura’ Napa Valley Bordeaux Blend  $46  WS 89

Steven Kent  Merlot   $ unknown  Not Rated (corked)

Of the 12 wines, 3 were corked (fault = TCA) which is 25% of the wines tasted.  While professionals vary in opinion as to the percentage of corked bottles normally encountered, it is generally in the 3 – 8% range.  If a wine is defective due to the cork, the problem took place the moment the cork was inserted into the bottle. Our sample size with the large percentage of corked bottles is simply an outlier.  TCA does not happen with time; it immediately affects the wine.  Since the TCA presented itself from slightly corked to awful, it gave the group practice in identifying the TCA flaw and how it can vary.

There were three wines that were still in the ‘hold or ready-to-drink’ category, exhibiting classic markers for the varietal and lovely on the palate.  I have noted ‘exceptional’ by these wines.  Please note that price is not necessarily a factor in determining if a wine will last for an extended period.  The ability of a wine to age is influenced by many factors which include the grape variety, vintage, viticulture practices, acidity, tannins, wine region, winemaking style, etc.  For these 3 wines, Barolo (Italy), Brunello (Italy) and Tempranillo (Rioja, Spain), they all normally exhibit medium plus to high levels of tannins and medium plus to high levels of acidity, which in my opinion, the acidity being the ‘fountain of youth’ of wine.

Of the remaining 6 wines, some presented a bit of an ‘over the hill’ character but most were drinkable, enjoyable and a nice pairing to the accompanying dish.  This is where personal preference comes into the equation and the ability to compare, contrast and evaluate teaches you by experience about the life of a wine.  There are very few wines, in my humble opinion, that are still grand at the end of the extended period some professionals tout wine will last. 

The Perrin Les Cornuds Vinsobres from the Rhone Valley of France was a $20 purchase that still rocked 10 years later.  While the 2010 vintage was an exceptional one, the terroir of Vinsobres is particularly suitable for Syrah as it preserves the finesse which is often lost in more southern, warmer climates. It develops notes of violet, smoked meat and blackberries. Grenache is also suited to this terroir, full bodied and not heavy, with notes of chocolate, cherry and typical Garrigue aromas.  A blend of Syrah and Grenache, this was a lovely wine.

The Sainte-Estephe Lafon-Rochet, a Fourth Growth Bordeaux, at $69 was a bit of a disappointment.  It was very dark and intense in color, exhibited muted fruit, but on the palate, we encountered a gritty, chalky character that felt like the phenolics in the wine precipitating out of solution.  I have other bottles of this wine and will have to re-evaluate at another time.  This wine definitely did not rock my world.

I could continue, but it’s time for you to take a good look at your cellar and pick out wines that you believe you may have held too long.   Make a list of the vintage, country, region, producer and hopefully, that list is not too terribly long.  Make a second list of the remaining wines so you know what you still have and are wines you believe can wait a while to be consumed.  For the ‘over the hill’ wines, place them into groupings.  I would suggest:

Vintage

Country

Region

You can then approach your tasting a couple of different ways.  Gather all like wines (varietal or country/region or vintage) and begin to taste!  For our tasting, we focused on 4 elements:

Visual – Anything floating, wine cloudy? Color correct for the varietal?

Nose – Fruit present? Fresh? Dried? Dessicated/Moldy?

Wood – Oak? What kind?    Floral – What kind?

Earth – Wet? Dried? None?

Balance – Acid, Sugar, Tannin – balanced or does one overpower?

Finish – how long? For a long finish, usually 20 to 30 seconds.

I know it would be so much more fun to do this with friends; however, take notes, take a wine each night (or every so many nights) and do your evaluation.  Taking notes will help you compare and contrast and figure out which wines you think are still good and which are over the hill.  You will learn a lot about the wines, your particular tastes as you may find you really don’t like wines from certain areas or you no longer like Zinfandel, etc., and the bonus is you will have a cleaned out cellar!  Enjoy the journey…then, on to that coat closet…

If you want to tell us about your experience in cleaning out your cellar, I invite you to share your comments with us or ask questions to help you along on your journey!

Santé

Sudsy

2016 Domaine Grand Veneur “Champauvins” Cotes du Rhone-Villages

I had the pleasure of tasting this bottling from Alain Jaume at an event the other night, coming back around the room and sampling it twice just to make sure. 

Hailing from the Southern Rhone, this wine is a Cotes du Rhone Villages, a step up from the generic Cotes du Rhone wines. These bottlings of ‘Villages’ are frequently found here in the US as they can represent some of the best values in the market and are priced less than a Gigondas or a Chateauneuf du Pape wine.  However, as with all wines, producers do matter and Alain Jaume delivers quality.

Visually, the wine was dark ruby in color with a solid core.  On the nose, a good dose of black cherry, blackberry, lavender, and tobacco leaf with a bit of peppery spice presented. On the palate, the wine was full bodied and concentrated with good red and black fruits and that Southern Rhone garrique element…lavender, spice and sun kissed rocks.  There are tannins present with medium acidity which helps to bring all the elements together.  The finish lingers.  A very tasty wine!

This is a GSM blend of 70% Grenache, 20% Syrah and 10% Mourvedre.  I found it locally at these sellers:

K&L Wine Merchants      $ 19.99

The Wine Steward       $ 25.99  (discount given on case sales)

Total Wine     $ 23.99  (discount given on purchase of 6 wines)

If you are looking for a rock-solid wine for the Holidays, this will deliver a lot of flavor and body at a modest price. 

Established in the northern part of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, in the commune of Orange, the Jaume family has been dedicated to the art of wine growing since 1826. Founded by Mathieu Jaume, the Domaine is now run by the 5th and 6th generations of Jaumes: Alain Jaume & his children Christophe, Sébastien, and Hélène.

Sante!

Sudsy

Does ‘vintage’ matter?

I thoroughly enjoyed this 2009 Tronquoy-Lalande last evening.  The wine was inky in color thanks to the addition of Petit Verdot in this St. Estephe Bordeaux blend of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Tight at first, the nose opened up to black cherries, dark berries, tobacco with a hint of French roasted coffee and minerality.  The oak structure was present but soft and the oak was well integrated in the wine.  On the palate, it still had primary fruit flavors with good structure and soft tannins. The finish was long and all the elements described were evident in the finale.  A really good bottle of Left Bank Bordeaux!

The media touted 2009 as a great vintage just to turn around in 2010 and claim it as the better of the two.  The 2009 vintage had almost perfect weather and growing conditions producing wines that are a bit softer in tannin and more approachable in their youth.  The 2009 Tronquoy-Lalande from St. Estephe (at 10 years of age) was a good representation of the deliciousness of this vintage.  As for the 2010 vintage, the conditions were somewhat variable and although it is considered a classic vintage as well, the 2010 wines are more tannic and will take more time to soften and integrate.  I suspect some may lose their fruit before the transformation occurs.

So, does vintage matter?  Yes!  Maybe not if you are purchasing ‘Wednesday wines’ to enjoy with your pizza tonight, but certainly if you are investing your money in wines to hold for a while.  I consider ‘Wednesday wines’ to be good quality wine, ready to drink now and not intended to age.  For the cellar, I purchase classic examples of wines of good quality, not ready to drink now but to hold as these should improve with age…hopefully.

To borrow (and tweak) a line from Forrest Gump, ‘Wine is like a box of chocolates.  You never know what you’re going to get.”  It’s the journey that really counts and you can be sure you will always learn something and enjoy yourself along the way!

Santé

Sudsy

What are you serving with your Thanksgiving fare?

For a great start with appetizers, soup and salad, I’ll serve the La Petite Marquise Crémant de Loire Brut ($12.99 from K&L Wine Merchants).  It’s a sparkling wine made like champagne, but it sits light and fresh on the palate without the yeasty taste or a big price.  It is crafted from a blend of Chenin Blanc, Chardonnay and Cabernet Franc.

Going a bit out of the box, I picked up two Darcy Kent wines from Livermore after attending a Darcy Kent Vineyards pairing dinner at the Thunderbird Lodge in Lake Tahoe: a 2017 Gruner Veltliner from Rava Blackjack Vineyard in Monterey and a 2018 Victories Rose Malbec from the San Francisco Bay.  The Gruner is dry but flavorful with white peach, pepper and a bit of lime. The Malbec rose is lush as it was crafted with a slight bit of residual sugar which makes the wine creamy on the palate.  Both these wines will sparkle with the herbal flavors of the meal and the roasted butternut squash as a side.  Note: these selections are both low in alcohol as well.

For red wines, I am offering the Pardon & Fils Les Mouilles Julienas 2017 at $17.99 and the Domaine Pardon Cuvee Hugo Fleurie 2017 at $19.99, both from Total Wine.  Yes, this is Gamay from Beaujolais.  I love Gamay.  Not the market driven swill released in November which was nothing but a ploy to get rid of a lot of wine they could not otherwise sell.  The southern half of Beaujolais makes that inferior wine.  The northern half of Beaujolais has different soil, has slopes and the area has 10 ‘Cru’s’ which, in a fantastic year, can be hard to tell apart from a true Burgundy wine.  The two wines I have chosen are from Cru vineyards: Fleurie and Julienas. 

I will open the wines and explain what we have to our guests. I will encourage them to take small tastes of each wine before dinner. Then, all the bottles will go on the dinner table for them to revisit with the meal. It becomes an empowering game for our guests to be able to evaluate the wines and usually makes for some lively conversation because, of course, no one ever has an opinion!

For dessert, I will be serving a 2004 Château Tirecul la Gravière “Cuvée Chateau” Monbazillac. It’s 500 ml and it’s priced at $19.99 from K&L. It has some age on it and will be lucious with some Marscapone on top of that pumpkin pie.

Happy Thanksgiving!